Railway Walks Western Australia


To walk and explore old disused railways is a great way to spend a Sunday. They are often an easy walk and one the the whole family can enjoy. You find that the trail is wide and quite flat so not only level walking you could even get on your push bike and ride it. We love the history that comes along with these walks as well and if you keep your eyes peeled you could even find an old rail peg or two.

In this post we will bring you rail walks from around Western Australia. We haven’t walked them all as yet but as we do we will post photos and give any extra information we can, mean while have a read through and you might find a rail walk to suit you.


The Darling Range

Kalamunda Railway Heritage Trail

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  • About the Trail; This Trail is a very popular trail to walk with plenty of history but sadly very little information available though it is another trail that is part of the Heritage Trails Network. We know this trail having grown up in Kalamunda and we were always riding our bikes on it. The trail was used by the timber industry back in 1891 when it was established to cart timber from the Canning Jarrah Mill down to Midland. This line open up new opportunities for Kalamunda and surrounding areas not only with the timber but providing easy transport for fresh Fruit and Vegetables for Perth as well as giving tourists a chance to get up into the Darling Range area and experience its natural beauty. Sad to say the line closed in 1949 but is now a wonderful Heritage Trail to be enjoyed by all. Friends of the Railway Reserve currently look after the trail.
  • Starts; this starts at the top of the Zig Zag in Gooseberry Hill, at the end of the Zig Zag Kalamunda Trail,and continues along through Kalamunda, Walliston, Bickley, Carmel
  • Distance;  approx 11km’s, (we will be remeasuring) if you walk out to Canning Rd in Carmel, or 6km’s if you stop at the old Walliston Landing, near the corner of Grove and Mitchell Roads.
  • Difficulty; we class this level at 1-2, as it is an easy flat wide trail, though it can be loose underfoot with the gravel. Assisted Wheelchair and Pram friendly and used frequently by bicycles.

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Zig Zag Kalamunda Trail

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  • About the trail;  the trail was used by the timber industry back in 1891 when it was established to cart timber from the Canning Jarrah Mill down to Midland. This line open up new opportunities for Kalamunda and surrounding areas not only with the timber but providing easy transport for fresh fruit and vegetables for Perth as well as giving tourists a chance to get up into the Darling Range area and experience its natural beauty. Sad to say the line closed in 1949 but is now a wonderful Heritage Trail to be enjoyed by all and links onto and is part of the Kalamunda Railway Heritage Trail. (see above).
  • Starts; starts at the bottom of hill in the Gooseberry Hill National Park, on Ridge Hill Rd, then zig zags it’s way up the hill.
  • Distance; approx 3km’s one way.
  • Difficulty; hard one to class as it is a narrow bitumen road the whole way, though quite steep. We would say 2-3 and is assisted wheelchair accessible, (you would have a strong person pushing you up) and pram accessible. We won’t say that it’s wheelchair or pram friendly as it is also a road and do note there are no footpaths so it is shared with cars and bikes.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au. 

Railway Reserves Heritage Trail

  • About the trail; this trail retraces the old Eastern Railway that had once linked the port city of Fremantle out to York back in the 1880’s and is another trail that is part of the Heritage Trails Network. There are plenty of places to stop and have a picnic or even stop in one of the towns and grab a bite to eat. There is nothing better than a country bakery! If you don’t want to walk the whole trail or even if you want to walk it over a period time there are plenty of places along the way that are accessible, just grab a map. (see below).
  • Starts; in Bellevue and ends at the Wooroloo Reserve. You will walk through places like SwanView, Parkerview, Stoneville, Mt Helena then up to Chidlow and onto Wooroloo.
  • Loop alternative; this is 41 km’s loop and also starts in Bellevue. It follows the same trail through places like SwanView, Parkerview, Stoneville,  and at Mt Helena is where the trail swings around and heads south to Sawyers Valley then turns west towards Mundaring, Glen Forrest, Darlington and onto Bellevue.
  • Distance; 59km or the alternative loop route 41km.
  • Difficulty; we class this one at level 1-2 as it is and east flat wide trail but long. Can ride your push bike or horse. Assisted wheelchair friendly and pram friendly.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.mundaringtourism.com.au, http://www.trailswa.com.au, (though this site only talks about the loop section). http://www.railtrails.org.au or pop into any of the information centres.

Farming Heritage Trail

  • About the Trail; We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as there is not a lot of information out there on it and we have not yet walked it. We have included it and hope to soon have a chance to explore this Rail Trail, then I will be able to update the info we have for you. This is an extension of the Railway Reserves Heritage Trail that follows on from Wooloroo to Northam.
  • Starts; from Ron Evans Park on the corner of Green st and Government rd. You will walk through farmland, pass Wundowie, Bakers Hill and onto Clackline.
  • Distance; approx 18km, when we walk it we will check.
  • Difficulty; Flat and we would imagine very much like the Railway Reserves Heritage Trail.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au.

Mundaring Weir Rail Trail

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  • About the trail; this rail was in operation between the years 1889 – 1952. It’s purpose was for transporting workers to and from the weir for the construction and the maintenance. Along this trail you will discover the history of the area you are walking from the information shelters you find along the way. There are plenty of picnic sites and toilets too. You can do sections of this trail as most parts are accessible by car.
  • Starts; In Mundaring at the Sculpture Park, off Jacoby St, and wander down towards the weir. You will see signs for other trails like the Kep track and the Munda Biddi, you pretty well follow the Kep track. You will continue past the Golf Course, past Fred Jacoby Park and ending at the Mundaring Weir Hotel. Great meals here so plan to arrive for lunch. You can end here or walk back to walk off the yummy food.
  • Distance; 7km one way
  • Difficulty; We class this as a level 2-3.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.mundaringtourism.com.au.

Mason and Bird Heritage Trail

  • About the trail; this is another trail that is part of the Heritage Trails Network and is also one of the oldest timber routes in Western Australia. In the 1860’s Benjamin Mason established a timber station down at Mason’s Landing on the Canning river where timber from the immediate area was being loaded and transported to Fremantle and Perth. Seeing the need to grow he applied for a licence and built what is known as ‘Mason’s Mill’ in the Carmel area. Along with Francis Bird  the 14km tramway track was built and opened in 1872, being the second horse drawn tramway to open in WA.
  • Starts; at the picnic area of the Bickley Outdoor Recreation Centre on Hardinge Road. Be aware that there are two trails starting here, the Kattamorda Heritage Trail through the white gates, and the Mason and Bird trail through the boulders. You will join up and walk along the Kattamorda trail for a while not far down the track.You pass the remaining foundations from the old Boys Brigade Camp before getting to the Munday Brook Bridge. You then will come across a car park and gates to the Victoria Dam where you will turn right and follow towards the dam passing the gravesite of little Francis Watson,(died at 2 days old in 1867),  this is where you end or walk back the way you came.
  • Distance; 8km one way
  • Difficulty; we would class this as a 2-3 level.
  • More information and Maps; you can download a trail brochure from http://www.gosnells.wa.gov.au.

Jarrahdale 1872 Heritage Railway Trail

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  • About the trail; this is another trail that is part of the Heritage Trails Network and is in the Historical Town of Jarrahdale. In 1872 the first timber mill was operational in this area with around 40km of tramway built, this with wooden rails, and transporting timber to the Rockingham Port. By 1896 there were 5 operational mills with around 100km of tramways going throughout the bush. In the end there was 14 operational mills all being steam power except the last one, built in 1968, as this was electric. Milling continued in this area till 1997 when the last mill was closed down. Bauxite mining was big in the area as well as Alcoa began it’s operations in 1963 and transported the ore to the crushing plants and onto the Kwinana refinery, this all ceasing in 1998. This trail takes you alongside the disused Bauxite Railway and on the path that the 1872 Timber Tramway once laid before doing a loop around through the Jarrah forest and back to the Tramway.
  • Starts; at the information bay on the corner of Nettleton and Jarrahdale rds. Follow the Bauxite railway to Buckland rd turning right then left onto Hughes rd. This is the old 1872 Tramway, keep eyes out for the left turn sign taking you off the tramway and into the bushland between the Bauxite Railway and the Tramway before joining the tramway again.You walk along where this historical tramway was until you turn right to climb up a long steep section with views on a good day out to the ocean. You then head down towards Gingagup Brook before following it around and loops back to rejoin the trail back along the Tramway and back to the information board.

Balmoral Trail

  • About this Trail;  We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. What we have learnt though is a Tramway Trail that follows along the old 1890’s timber tramway out to the POW Camp. This Camp was originally set up for the army at the commencement of WW2 but then converted into a POW Camp, holding up to 200 prisoners, these prisoners were Italians from North Africa sent here during 1943 and 1944.
  • Starts; Jarrahdale to Balmoral POW Camp
  • Distance; not 100% sure as we have found conflicting numbers. Should be approx 11km and when we walk it we will put the correct distance down.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au,

The South West

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Denmark to Nornalup Heritage Rail Trail

  • About this Trail; We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. From research this trail sounds to be extremely scenic with you walking through forests, farmlands and along the coast. Back in the late 1890’s this trail was established by the Millar brothers to cart timber from the local Jarrah forests, by 10yrs they apparently had cleared all the area and it was shut down. The WA Government bought the town, land and railway and the line became a commercial line to Albany by 1908. This had assisted the local dairy and agricultural farmers and the fishing and timber industries. To read more about the history of this trail as we have found it to be quite a bit check out http://www.denmarkwa.asn.au.
  • Starts; Denmark and finishes in Nornalup. We believe there are still 4 of the original timber bridges to cross. Do be aware that this trail is a multi use trail for walkers and mountain bikers, even a section for horses too. There are sections of this trail that is also used by cars so be aware and careful.
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be between 54.5km and 59km. When we do walk this trail we will be sure to update any info needed.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy though we did read that some sections can be soft sand.
  • More Information and Maps; http://www.denmark.com.au, http://www.trailswa.com.au, http://www.railtrails.org.au.

Sidings Rail Trail

  • About this Trail; We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. On research we see that this railway used old woodfired steam trains back in the early 1900’s to cart timber form the mills out to the then port of Busselton. This is also part of the Munda Biddi Trail.
  • Starts; Nannup and finishes in Jarrahwood. We believe that the trail starts at the old rail bridge in the Nannup Foreshore Park and links up with the Old Timberline Trail (see below) This trail is also part of the Munda Biddi Trail.
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be between 22km and 26km. When we do walk this trail we will be sure to update any info needed.  Apparently you can loop this trail up with the Old Timberline Trail (see below) and it is around 37km.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au, http://www.trailswa.com.au.

Old Timberline Trail

  • About this Trail;  We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. On research we see that this railway used old woodfired steam trains back in the early 1900’s to cart timber form the mills out to the then port of Busselton. We also believe that there is an overnight hut at the bend of St. John Brook.
  • Starts; Nannup and ends in Cambray
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be between 20km’s and 22kms.  When we do walk this trail we will be sure to update any info needed.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy though we have read it can be hilly in some sections.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.mundabiddi.org.au, you can also purchase a trailmap for $4.95 from http://www.shop.dpaw.wa.gov.au, http://www.trailswa.com.au, http://www.railtrails.org.au.

Torbay to Elleker Rail Trail

  • About this Trail;  We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. On research we see that this is a muliti use trail for cyclists and horseriders as well and links the two towns together. This is also a part of the Munda Biddi Trail.
  • Starts; the hall in Torbay and ends in Elleker
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be 8km.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au, or pop into any of the information centres.

Hopetoun to Ravensthorpe Railway Heritage Walk

  • About this Trail; We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. On research we see that this railway was in operation between 1909 and 1935. It was built to connect the mines in the area to the port of Hopetoun. We believe this trail is broken up into several smaller sections so you can enjoy shorter walks. For some history on this trail check out http://www.wastations.i8.com as well as http://www.railheritagewa.org.au.
  • Starts; Hopetoun and ends in Raventhorpe.
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be 39km. When we do walk this trail we will be sure to update any info needed.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au, or pop into any of the information centres.

Gloucester Tree to Cascades Tramway Walk

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  • About this Trail; this trail is in one of our favourite places Pemberton! It is along a section of the Bibbulmun Track and follows the part of one of the many tramways that are through the bushland.
  • Starts; at the Gloucester Tree, which is a 60 metre karri tree that once was an old fire lookout. You follow the Bibbulmun Track trail markers through this beautiful karri forest.
  • Distance; 6km one way.
  • Difficulty; we would class this one a level 1-2
  • More information and Maps; http://www.trailswa.com.au, http://www.railtrails.org.au, or pop into any of the information centres.

Collie to Darkan Rail Trail

  • About this Trail; We don’t know a whole lot about this trail as we have not yet walked it but when we do we will be sure to add the correct info here for you. On research we see that this trail is a multi use trail with bike riders and horse using it. We believe there is a place to use as an over night stop at the old Bowelling Station, but we need to follow this one up.
  • Starts; starts around 20kms east of Collie, though having trouble confirming this at this point, and ends in Darkan.
  • Distance; Not 100% sure as we have not walked and measured it but in research found it to be 47km.
  • Difficulty; As we haven’t walked this one it is hard to say though through research we see it is relatively easy.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.railtrails.org.au. There is a Facebook page – Collie to Darkan Rail Trail that is worth a look, or pop into any of the information centres.

Wadandi Track Rail Trail

  • About this Trail; On research we see that this trail uses one of the many rail lines that a timber businessman, M C Davies had developed to take the timber from his mills out to Hamelin Bay and Flinders Bay. This trail is the old Busselton – Flinders Bay Rail Trail and can be done as a sectional trail you may also know it as the Rails to Trails Line. Do be aware this is a multi use Trail, there are bicycles and horses using it as well. You walk through beautiful timber forests and farm land it is such a great walk.
  • Starts; Does actually start in Busselton using existing paths, when you reach Vasse there is no official trail to Cowaramup and from there you can continue on through to Witchcliffe passing Margaret River.
  • Distance; depending where you start and end. Cowaramup – Witchcliffe is approximately 23km.
  • Difficulty; we class this trail as 1 as it is very flat and easy. We would say this is wheelchair friendly and pram friendly though it is not paved so assistance might be needed.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.margaretriver.com, http://www.railtrails.org.au,  or pop into any of the information centres.

Ten Mile Brook Trail

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  • About this Trail; This is another great walk and was named after the small brook that was dammed in the mid 1990’s to help with water supply to Margaret River. The walk follows one of the many old timber tramways in the area.
  • Starts; this trail starts at the Rotary Park on the Northern entrance of Margaret River. You will see ‘Old Kate’ sitting there, she was the first steam train in this area and is great to see her there. The trail ends at the Rusden Picnic site or you can retrace your steps.
  • Distance; 7.5km or 15km return.
  • Difficulty; this Trail is classed as a level 1-2. We saw people pushing prams so it can be accessible and wheelchairs but with support. The picnic area at Rusden Park is Mobility friendly. for more info on that check out http://www.accesswa.com.au.
  • More information and Maps; http://www.trailswa.com.au, http://www.railtrails.org.au, or pop into any of the information centres.
Categories: Australian Trail, bush walks, hiking trails, Rail Trails, southwest Trails, Urban Trails, Western AustraliaTags: , , , , , ,

6 comments

  1. Very comprehensive list of walks…..all look very interesting….looking forward very much to getting out there and Walking, especially the Jarrahdale one…

    Liked by 1 person

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